People

Jason Beckfield

Jason Beckfield

Professor of Sociology, Department of Sociology, Harvard University.

Jason Beckfield specializes in the cross-national and historical comparative analysis of economic inequality. His first project related to the initiative investigates gender inequality in labor force participation and wages in the European Union, after the Equal Pay Directive. In addition, he is developing an institutional theory of health inequalities, with the aim of explaining puzzling cross-national variation in gender inequalities in health.

Iris Bohnet

Iris Bohnet

Professor of Public Policy; Director, Women and Public Policy Program, Harvard Kennedy School.

Iris Bohnet, Professor of Public Policy at Harvard Kennedy School and Director of its Women and Public Policy Program, is a behavioral economist combining insights from economics and psychology to improve decision-making in organizations and society, often with a gender or cross-cultural perspective. Her most recent research examines behavioral design to de-bias how we live, learn and work. She is the author of WHAT WORKS: Gender Equality By Design (Harvard University Press, 2016).

Mary Brinton

Mary Brinton

Reischauer Institute Professor of Sociology; Chair, Department of Sociology, Harvard University.

Mary Brinton is a social scientist whose research centers on gender inequality in the labor market, with particular attention to comparisons across East Asia, Europe, and the US. Her research combines qualitative and quantitative methods to study institutional change and its effects on individual action, particularly in labor markets. Brinton generally engages in primary data collection for her research projects, and has designed social surveys, interviews, and observational studies in Japan and South Korea. Among her publications are Lost in Transition: Youth, Work, and Instability in Postindustrial Japan and Women’s Working Lives in East Asia. She is currently studying the relationship between gender inequality and delayed family formation in East Asia and Southern Europe.

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Claudia Goldin

Henry Lee Professor of Economics, Department of Economics, Harvard University.

Claudia Goldin is an economic historian and labor economist who studies current issues through the lens of the past. Her book Understanding the Gender Gap: An Economic History of American Women remains a classic in the field. Her most recent book, The Race between Education and Technology (with Larry Katz), concerns economic inequality. In the past several years her work has focused on college women’s achievement of career and family and the reasons for the gender gap in pay. Her most recent project concerns the increase of women’s employment in their mature and older years.

Alexandra Killewald

Alexandra Killewald

John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Social Sciences, Department of Sociology, Harvard University.

Alexandra (Sasha) Killewald’s research takes a demographic approach to the study of social stratification. Much of her work focuses on the work-family intersection—particularly regarding the ways in which earnings and employment shape women’s time in household labor, and how marriage and parenthood affect workers’ wages. Another area of her research examines the influence of parental wealth on adult outcomes, including the role of parental wealth in explaining the black-white wealth gap. Killewald is the co-author of Is American Science in Decline?

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Kathleen McGinn

Cahners-Rabb Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School.

Kathleen McGinn studies the role of gender and relationships at work, at home, and in negotiations. Her current field research investigates these issues internationally—in families, among women “firsts,” in North American professional service firms, across organizations and communities in Mexico and India, and in relation to health and welfare outcomes for young women in Zambia. McGinn has published extensively and her HBS working paper, "Mums the Word! Cross-national Relationship between Maternal Employment and Gender Inequalities at Work and at Home" recently received prominent media coverage.